learning from the prd

This week in The Economist, an introduction to the PRD as China’s most dynamic, open, and innovative region. Good overview that introduces landmarks for navigating a landscape which has changed and continues to change China. And yes, Learning from Shenzhen gets a shout out!

join us in ann arbor!

ann arbor

accessibility

So yesterday I flew from Hong Kong to Ithaca, NY via the new Shekou Cruise Ship Terminal. There just as one walks in to the waiting room stood an international sim card vending machine. It holds phone sim cards for Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, the United States and the Philippines. There are also internet sim cards for Europe, United Arab Emirates, India, Hong Kong, and Macau. So yes, this is a pretty reliable map of what are now know as “the one belt, one road countries”.

the new shekou cruise ship terminal…

…is big and far from the subway station that so usefully served the old ferry terminal. And yes, hidden behind reclaimed construction sites, the new terminal embodies how Qianhai–as a place and eponymous ambition–is reshaping the coast. Again.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

red earth, red river. yunan.

Visiting the Honghe Vineyard in Mi Le, Yunan, I am reminded how necessary a full sense life is; yes, it is beautiful here, but even more than visual, this is a beauty of open ears, nose, and mouth. Birds sing, flowers entice, spices and herbs tempt the tongue, and the breeze lightly touches open skin. Yet, in the middle of it all, my guide points to an “urban village.” The form has been generalized, something else that we have learned from Shenzhen and Guangzhou. Can there be meaningful rural life when urban consumption of the rural has pre-empted actual villages as the presumed mode of living, even here.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

in hong kong, thinking prd

poster

introducing handshake 302

We are slow, but we move forward. Here’s Handshake’s most recent intro-PDF:

handshake-302