migrations is open!

The Migrations exhibition opened beneath bright sun and clear skies, bringing together people from Longhua and Dalang, as well as graduate students from Shenzhen University and Langkou aunties. The opening ceremony celebrated the central idea of the 7th edition of the Biennale “Cities grow in difference,” taking advantage of the contrasts between the restored P+V, its surrounding urban village, and the clean design of INFUTURE. These contrasts created a particularly postmodern aesthetic that celebrated three generations of migrants—Hakkas who came to the area 300 years ago, missionaries who arrived 150 years ago, and the Shenzheners who have been path breaking Shenzhen since 1980. Indeed, the these differences are the nutrients that have made Shenzhen’s unique migrant culture. Continue reading

it’s happening at the P+V!

 

This past six months the Migrations curatorial team has been busy creating an exciting exhibition and now we’re ready to share the fruit of our labor with our neighbors in Langkou Village and our friends throughout Shenzhen. We are proud to present five new artworks especially commissioned for this exhibit and thrilled to introduce the repatriated objects of Switzerland’s “Chinese children.”

On Friday, December 22, 2017 at 10:00 we will hold our opening ceremony. Come for a fresh take on history, stay for the sweet rice balls of the winter solstice, and learn about our multifaceted public program!

1391513821285_.pic

Public Programs for Migrations

The activities organized for the Migrations exhibition aim to create knowledge about Shenzhen’s history and to catalyze reflection on how departure and arrival shape human lives. On the face of it, these are broad topics, more suitable for a classroom or seminar than a small gallery in a remote urban village. However, overcoming the distance between “downtown” and “the outer districts” is one of the central ideas of this edition of the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture (UABB), just as bringing “art” and “ordinary lives” closer together has been an ongoing ideal of Handshake 302. Continue reading

What Does Art Teach Us About History?

In the Republic, Plato argues that the faults of poets are many. In addition to being irrational, they—and this is their gravest fault, he says—“invent” stories about events that never happened. In other words, Plato conflated “story telling” with “telling lies.”

In fact, historians artists approach the past from two different perspectives. Historians are interested in figuring out what happened when and why, while artists explore the past in order to discover future possibilities. Continue reading